HOME > Course Materials > Grammar - Adverbs
ADVERBS

Adverbs modify or specify the meaning of a verb, adjective or another adverb. They are invariable.

 

DIFFERENT ADVERBS Lesson i_11 back button

 

Most adverbs derive by the corresponding adjective and they are formed by adding "mente" to the ending of the feminine singular form of the adjective (onesta + mente = onestamente; forte + mente = fortemente...). Adjectives ending in "re" or "le" drop their "e" before adding "mente" (regolare + mente= regolarmente; gentile + mente = gentilmente). Other adverbs do not end with "mente" and the most common are: "bene" (well), "male" (badly), "ora" (now), "ieri" (yesterday), "oggi" (today), "poco" (little), "molto" (much), "prima" (before), "dopo" (after), "non" (not) ... There are several categories of adverbs. Following, are the most important:

 

There are several categories of adverbs. Following, are the most important:

  • Avverbi di modo - they indicate how a verb, adjective or another adverb is modified by an adverb: "lei cammina lentamente" (she walks slowly); the adverb "lentamente" indicates how the lady walks. Most of the adverbs ending in "-mente" belong to this cathegory. (Bene, male, lento, lentamente, quasi, volentieri etc.)
  • Avverbi di tempo - they indicate when or how many times an action is performed: "oggi sono stanco" (today I'm tired); the adverb "oggi" indicates when the person is tired. (Ora, prima, dopo, ieri, oggi, domani, mai, sempre, presto, spesso, etc.)
  • Avverbi di luogo - they indicate where an action is performed or where an object or subject is: "vado fuori" (I'm going out); the adverb "fuori" indicates where the subject is going. (Là, lì, qui, qua, sopra, sotto, dentro, fuori, davanti, dietro etc.)
  • Avverbi interrogativi (ed esclamativi!) - they usually introduce a question: "perché non scrivi una lettera?" (why don't you write a letter?); the adverb "perché" introduces the question. (Come, quando, dove, perché, quanto, etc.)
  • Avverbi di quantità - they indicate quantity: "sono molto stanco" (I'm very tired); the adverb "molto" indicates how tired the person is. (Poco, molto, tanto, troppo, parecchio, piuttosto, quanto, abbastanza, etc.)

Position of the adverb in the sentence:

 

The position of the adverb in the sentence changes depending on the noun, verb, adjective or other adverb to whom the adverb is referring.

 

1.If the adverb is referring to the verb, it follows the verb.

 

Example: "Io guardo molto la televisione" (I watch TV a lot)

 

2. If there is an object, the adverb is placed after the verb or at the end of the sentence.

 

Example: "Io guardo sempre la televisione".

"Io guardo la televisione sempre".

(I always watch television. I watch television always.)

 

3. If an adverb refers to a noun or an adjective, it is placed in front of it.

 

Example: "Guardo principalmente film d'azione".

"Sono, anche se non sembra, piuttosto stanco". (I watch mainly action movies. I am, even though it doesn't seem so, rather tired.)

 

4. Interrogative adverbs generally introduce a question and they are positioned at the beginning of the sentence.

 

Example: "Dove abiti? "(Where do you live?)

 

5. The pronoun and preposition usually precede the interrogative adverb.

 

Example: "Tu dove abiti? Da dove sei partito?" (Where do you live? From where did you leave?)

 

Comparative form of the adverbs:

 

Remember, the comparative form of the adverbs follows the rules of the adjectives: "il treno va più lentamente dell'aereo" (trains go more slowly than airplains.)

The superlative is always formed with "molto" + the adverb: "l'aereo viaggia molto velocemente" (the airplain travels very fast.) The adverbs "bene", "male", "poco", "molto" have the following irregular comparative:

 

Avverbio   Comparativo   Superlativo  
bene well meglio better benissimo
molto bene
very well
male badly peggio worse malissimo
molto male
very badly
poco little di meno, meno less pochissimo very little
molto much di più, più more moltissimo very much

 

NOTE The difference between an adjective, a pronoun or an adverb is that:

 

1. the adjective goes with the noun and agrees with it; "molti studenti vanno al cinema" (many students go to the movies)
2. the pronoun substitutes the noun; "molti vanno al cinema" (many go to the movies)
3. the adverb goes with the verb, adjective or another adverb and it is invariable; "gli studenti vanno molto al cinema" (students go a lot to the movies)

ADVANCED CONSTRUCTIONS

FORMAL APPROACH Lezione b_1 indietro

 

In Italy, you should have a formal approach with people you don't know or with whom you are not well acquainted (a teacher, a professor, an elderly person...), and an informal approach with friends and relatives.

 

To express a formal approach we change the sentence from 'tu' (you) to 'Lei' (She) and everything else changes consequently (e.g the verb changes to the third singular person)

  • Tu hai domande? (Do you have questions? Informal)
  • Lei ha domande? (Do you have questions? Formal)
  • Cosa desideri? (What do you wish? Informal)
  • Cosa desidera? (What do you wish? Formal)

If we are talking to a man, we still use the feminine pronoun "Lei" (She) for the formal approach but we maintain adjectives or the past participle in the masculine form:

  • Tu sei contento? (Are you happy? Informal)
  • Lei è contento? (Are you happy? Formal)
  • Tu sei andato in ufficio? (Did you go to the office? Informal)
  • Lei è andato in ufficio? (Did you go to the office? Formal)

In the plural form the formal approach is expressed with "Loro":

  • Cosa desiderate? (What do you wish? Informal)
  • Cosa desiderano? (What do you wish? Formal)

 

LA NARRAZIONE Lesson i_6, Lesson i_7, Lesson a_5back button

 

There are many ways to "narrate" or tell a fact that happened in the past. Oftentimes the choice of "how to narrate" depends on the style of those who narrate or on the emphasis that they want to give to certain aspects of the tale.

 

In general we can say that the imperfetto "describes" the moment in the past, or the situation we were, when something happened. It "sets-up" the action (quando ero giovane... = when I was young...)

 

The passato prossimo expresses a well defined action - begun and completed in the past (...sono andato a Parigi = ...I went to Paris.)

  • Mentre andavo in ufficio, ho incontrato il mio amico.
    (While I was going to the office I met my friend.)
  • Quando avevo dieci anni, ho visitato Roma.
    (When I was ten years old, I visited to Rome.)
  • Abitavo a Parigi e allora ho iniziato a studiare pittura.
    (I was living in Paris and so I started to study painting.)

  • Gli ospiti andavano via e quindi anche io ho salutato e sono andato via.
    (The guests were leaving, therefore I said goodbye and left.)

The trapassato prossimo expresses an action that happened prior to the one expressed by another past tense.

  • Stamattina, dopo che avevo messo la camicia pulita, mi è caduto il caffè addosso. 
    (This morning, after I wore a clean shirt, I spilled the coffee on it).

Il passato remoto (remote-past tense) is rarely used in conversation and is widely used in writing for historical or literary narrations.

 

For example, in spoken language Italians generally prefer to use the passato prossimo rather than the passato remoto. They prefer to say, "Da bambino una volta sono andato a Parigi" (when I was a child once I have been to Paris) instead of "da bambino una volta andai a Parigi" (when I was a child once I went to Paris).

 

The use of the passato remoto depends on how much emphasis is given to the remoteness or "historicity" of the action. In some regions of Italy, however (especially in Tuscany or in the south) the passato remoto is more commonly used or sometimes even preferred to the passato prossimo.

 

IMPORTANT:  for consistency, if you begin to narrate using the passato remoto you have to continue with the passato remoto: Da bambino, una volta andai a Parigi; poi non ebbi più occasione di fare un viaggio (As a child, once I went to Paris; then I no longer had a chance to travel).

If you start narrating using the passato prossimo, you have to continue with the passato prossimo: Da bambino, una volta sono andato a Parigi; poi non ho avuto più occasione di fare un viaggio (As a child, once I have been to Paris; then I have no longer had a chance to travel).

 

The imperfetto may accompany the passato prossimo or the passato remoto:

  • Da bambino viaggiavo sempre con i miei genitori. Una volta andai a Parigi con loro e visitammo il Louvre, poi non ebbi più occasione di viaggiare (As a child I used to travel with my parents. Once I went to Paris with them and we visited the Louvre; then I no longer had a chance to travel).
  • Da bambino viaggiavo sempre con i miei genitori. Una volta sono andato a Parigi con loro e abbiamo visitato il Louvre, poi non ho avuto più occasione di viaggiare (As a child I used to travel with my parents. Once I have been to Paris with them and we have visited the Louvre; then I have no longer had a chance to travel).

Please note: the translation of the Italian past tenses into English is not easy nor it can be expressed literally, as in English the use of the past tenses is different.

 

 

SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION: condizionale di dovere/volere/potere + infinito Lesson i_8 back button

 

"Dovere, volere, potere" are called "verbi servili", (verb that 'serve' - modal verbs) because they are followed by an infinitive.

They can also be used alone (especially "volere" e.g. "voglio una torta" = I want a cake) but, as modal verbs, they are used with another verb in the infinitive tense (e.g. "voglio viaggiare" = I want to travel). The verb "sapere" is also a modal verb.

 

In this special construction, when they are used in the conditional form, they can be confusing for English speaking students because they do not have a literal translation. Check the following examples:

  • Oggi io potrei andare al cinema ma tu non puoi. (I could go to the movies but you cannot.)
  • Oggi io vorrei andare al cinema ma tu non vuoi. (I would like to go to the movies but you do not want.)
  • Oggi io dovrei studiare, ma invece andrò al cinema! (I should study but instead I will go to the movies.)

They can be used also in the past conditional:

  • Io avrei potuto diventare una persona importante! (I could have become an important person!)
  • Io avrei voluto diventare una persona importante! (I would have liked to become an important person!)
  • Io avrei dovuto studiare per diventare una persona importante! (I should have studied in order to become an important person!)

 

IMPERSONAL CONSTRUCTION Lesson i_9 back button

 

When the subject of a sentence is generic and not specified (people, one, they...) the Italian language uses the impersonal construction.
It is formed with "si" plus the third singular person of the verb:

  • In Italia si cena alle otto (in Italy people have dinner at 8)
  • Qui non si fuma (no smoking here)
  • Si deve studiare per ottenere la laurea (one has to study to obtain one's degree)

When the verb is reflexive the particle "ci" precedes "si":

  • Per andare ad una festa ci si veste bene (to go to a party, people get well dressed)
  • Quando il treno ritarda ci si innervosisce (when the train is late, one becomes nervous)

If an adjective follows the verb, the adjective is in the plural masculine form:

  • Quando si è stanchi, ci si sente nervosi (when one is tired, one feels nervous)
  • A tavola si mangia seduti (at the table, one eats sitting)

Note: There is a costruction which is similar to the impersonal construction but is slightly different; it is called "passive si" construction.
The impersonal construction requires the third singular person of the verb:

  • in questo ristorante si mangia bene (people eat well in this restaurant)

The "passive si" construction requires the third singular or plural person of the verb according to the number of the object:

  • in questo ristorante si mangia la pizza (people eat pizza in this restaurant or pizza is eaten in this restaurant) In this case "pizza" is singular and the verb is singular.
  • in questo ristorante si mangiano pesce e patatine (in this restaurant people eat fish and chips or fish and chips are eaten in this restaurant) In this case "pesce e patatine" is plural and the verb is plural.

To recognize the difference between the impersonal construction and "si passivante", it may help you to know that in the passive construction you switch the subject.
The meaning of the sentence is the same but the construction is different.

 

Esempio

ACTIVE SENTENCE (THE SUBJECT IS PEOPLE): la gente mangia pizza in questo ristorante = people eat pizza in this restaurant
PASSIVE SENTENCE (THE SUBJECT IS PIZZA): la pizza è cotta bene in questo ristorante = pizza is well cooked in this restaurant
SI PASSIVANTE: in questo ristorante si mangia la pizza = in this restaurant one eats pizza

 

ATTIVA: la gente mangia pesce e patatine in questo ristorante = people eat fish and chips in this restaurant
PASSIVA: il pesce e le patatine sono preparati molto bene in questo ristorante = fish and chips are prepared very well in this restaurant
SI PASSIVANTE: in questo ristorante si mangiano pesce e patatine = in this restaurant one eats fish and chips

 

In the impersonal construction (e.g. "qui non si fuma") you cannot switch the subject.

 

 

RECIPROCAL CONSTRUCTION Lesson i_11 back button

 

The particle "ci" (for "we"), "vi" (for "you" plural) and "si" (for "they") are used to form the "reciprocal construction":

  • Telefoniamoci domani (let's call each other tomorrow)
  • Loro non si parlano (they don't talk to each other)
  • Scrivetevi! (write to each other!)

NOTE In a reciprocal construction, compound tenses require the verb "essere":

  • Non si sono più sentiti (they haven't talked to each other anymore)

 

SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION: "stare per" + infinito Lesson i_11 back button

 

This construction is formed with "stare per + infinitive":

  • Sto per partire (I'm about to leave)
  • Loro stanno per uscire (they are about to go out)

 

SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION: "stare" + gerundio Lesson i_11 back button

 

This construction is formed with "stare + gerundio":

  • Sto mangiando (I'm eating)
  • Stai studiando? (are you studying?)

 

IDIOMATIC EXPRESSIONS Lesson i_9, Lesson i_20, Lesson a_13, Lesson a_15, Lesson a_17, Lesson a_20 back button

 

In every language we find the so-called 'idiomatic expressions', which are sentences characteristic for their expressiveness; they are difficult to translate literally or rationally.

 

Here is a small list of commonly used idiomatic expressions. Check the lessons for more details.

 

Avere la stoffa del campione

To have what it takes to be a champion

(E.g. Hai la stoffa del campione = You have what it takes to be a champion)

Averne fin sopra i capelli

To be fed up with something or someone

(E.g. Ne ho fin sopra i capelli del mio lavoro = I'm fed up with my work)

Dai!

Come on!

(E.g. Dai, andiamo al cinema, non vieni mai! = Come on, let's go to the movies, you never come!)

Dare un colpo di telefono

To telephone

(E.g. Dalle un colpo di telefono = Call her)

Dare per scontato

To take for granted

(E.g. Non do mai niente per scontato = I never take anything for granted)

Darsi del tu, Dare del tu

To speak to each other informally, use an informal approach

(E.g. Diamoci del tu = Let's speak informally)

Darsi del Lei, Dare del Lei

To speak to each other formally, use a formal approach

(E.g. Dai del Lei all'insegnante = use a formal approach with the teacher)

Dare anni in meno o in più To give less years or more years (to define the age of a person)
Essere a secco

To be out of money or gasoline

(E.g. Sono a secco = I'm out of money)

Essere giù di morale

To feel down

(E.g. Sei giù di morale, perché? = You are feeling down. Why?)

Essere in piena forma

To feel great; be in great shape

(E.g. Sono in piena forma = I'm in great shape)

Essere fuori di sé

To be angry, enraged, furious

(E.g. Ieri ero fuori di me = Yesterday I was enraged)

Essere fuori di testa

To be out of control; nuts

(E.g. Stai attenta, quello è fuori di testa = Be careful, he is nuts)

Essere tagliato per un lavoro

To be cut out for the job

(E.g. Lui non è tagliato per quel lavoro = He is not cut out for that job)

Fare il bagno

To take a bath

(E.g. Vado a fare il bagno = lit. I go to take a bath = I'm going to take a bath)

Fare benzina

To get gasoline

(E.g. Devi fare benzina = You need to get gas)

Fare colazione

To have breakfast

(E.g. Faccio colazione alle 8 = I have breakfast at 8)

Fare due passi

To take a walk

(E.g. Voglio fare due passi = I want to take a walk)

Fare la doccia

To take a shower

(E.g. Fatti la doccia! = Take a shower!)

Fare una foto

To take a photograph

(E.g. Mi piace fare foto in vacanza = I like to take pictures on vacation)

Fare quattro chiacchiere

To chat

(E.g. Facciamo quattro chiacchiere = Let's have a chat)

Fare un salto

To drop by someone or somewhere

(E.g. Faccio un salto stasera = lit. I drop by tonight = I'm dropping by tonight or I will drop by tonight)

Farsi un nome

To become well known

(E.g. si è fatto un nome, è famoso = He is well known, he is famous)

Farsi in quattro

To work very hard

(E.g. Mi faccio in quattro tutti i giorni = I work very hard every day)

Farsi le ossa

To gain experience

(E.g. Si è fatto le ossa in fabbrica = He has gained experience in the factory)

Farsi prendere

To get caught up, to allow something or someone to take control of us

(E.g. Lui si è fatto prendere dalle emozioni = He got caught up in emotions)

In bocca al lupo

Good luck; break a leg

(E.g. Hai l'esame domani? In bocca al lupo! = Do you have the exam tomorow? Break a leg!)

Lasciare stare;
Lasciare perdere

To give up

(E.g. Lascia perdere, non ne vale la pena = Give it up, it is not worth it)

Mettersi in proprio

To set up on one's own

(E.g. Si è messa in proprio che era giovanissima = She set up her own business when she was very young)

Mi prendono i cinque minuti

I become furious, enraged

(E.g. Quando lo vedo mi prendono i cinque minuti = When I see him I become enraged)

Mollare l'osso

To let go

(E.g. Molla l'osso, non ne vale la pena = Let go, it is not worth it)

Non mi fa né caldo né freddo

It doesn't make any difference to me

(E.g. Zucchero o miele non mi fanno né caldo né freddo = Sugar or honey does not make any difference to me)

Non mollare

Don't give up

(E.g. Non mollare, devi dare l'esame! = Don't give up, you need to take the test!)

Non vedere l'ora di..

Looking forward to...

(E.g. Non vedo l'ora di partire = I'm looking forward to starting my trip)

Osso duro

Tough cookie

(E.g. Lui è un osso duro = He is a tough cookie)

Passarsela bene

To have a good period in life

(E.g. Me la passo proprio bene ora = I really have a good period of life now)

Prendere in giro

To pull one's leg

(E.g. Lei mi prende sempre in giro = She is always teasing me, pulling my leg)

Tenere a freno

To stop/control something or someone

(E.g. Tieni a freno le tue emozioni= Control your emotions)

Tenere duro

To hold on, don't give up

(E.g. Tieni duro, ancora poco e hai finito = Hold on, in a little while you will be done)

Un tipo in gamba

A smart, capable person

(E.g. Lei è davvero una tipa in gamba = She is truly smart)

A chi tocca? Tocca a noi.

Whose turn is it? It's our turn.

(E.g. Ora è il Suo turno, deve andare = Now it's your turn, you have to go)

Vecchia roccia

Good, old, strong person/ friend

(E.g. E' una vecchia roccia, niente lo abbatte = He is a strong person, nothing discourages him)

 

 

VERB "PIACERE" SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION Lezione i_5 indietro

 

The verb "Piacere" in Italian has a special construction where the subject of the sentence becomes the person or object doing the action of pleasing. We use the indirect object pronouns to identify whom the person/object is pleasing. It is harder explaining than showing some examples!

 

Mi piace il formaggio! (Il formaggio piace a me! = literally: the cheese pleases to me - I like cheese).
"Il formaggio" does the action of pleasing me and becomes the subject of the sentence.


Mi piacciono gli spaghetti! (Gli spaghetti piacciono a me! = literally: spaghetti please to me - I like spaghetti)
"Gli spaghetti" do the action of pleasing me and become the subject of the sentence.


Viaggiare mi piace! (Viaggiare piace a me! = literally: to travel pleases to me - I like traveling)
The act of travelling, "viaggiare", does the action of pleasing me and becomes the subject of the sentence.

 

Tu le piaci. (Tu piaci a lei). = She likes you.

 

Lei ti piace. (Lei piace a te). = You like her.

 

Ti piaccio? (Io piaccio a te?) = Do you like me?

 

A Mario piace mangiare. (Gli piace mangiare). = Mario likes eating.

 

Ai miei cugini piace dormire. (Gli piace dormire). = My cousins like sleeping.

 

A loro piacciono le città italiane. (Gli piacciono le città italiane). =They like Italian cities.

 

Al professore piacciono i libri antichi. (Gli piacciono i libri antichi). = The teacher likes ancient books.

 

Indirect

Pronoun

Verb Piacere To like
mi (a me)* piace I like
ti (a te) piace you like
gli (a lui) piace he likes
le (a lei) piace she likes
Le (a Lei) piace you like (formal)
ci (a noi) piace we like
vi (a voi) piace you like
gli (a loro) piace they like

 

*Either you use the indirect pronoun or the strong pronoun (e.g. either "mi" or "a me": mi piace la pizza = I like pizza. A me piace la pizza = I like pizza).

 

IMPORTANT. Please note, with the verb "piacere" we use the auxiliary "essere" to form combined tenses: mi è piaciuto = I have liked it.

 

Tu le sei piaciuto. (Tu sei piaciuto a lei). = She has liked you.

 

Lei ti è piaciuta. (Lei è piaciuta a te). = You have liked her.

 

Ti sono piaciuto? (Io sono piaciuto a te?) = Have you liked me?

 

A Mario è piaciuto mangiare. (Gli è piaciuto mangiare). = Mario has liked eating.

 

Ai miei cugini è piaciuto dormire. (Gli è piaciuto dormire). = My cousins have liked sleeping.

 

A loro sono piaciute le città italiane. (Gli sono piaciute le città italiane). =They have liked Italian cities.

 

Al professore sono piaciuti i libri antichi. (Gli sono piaciuti i libri antichi). = The teacher has liked ancient books.

 


"Piacere" can be used also only in the sense of pleasing to someone.


Io piaccio = I please, I am liked, people like me.
Io piaccio a te = I please you, you like me (I do the action of being liked by you).

 

As verbs are conjugated according to the subject of the sentence, when you use the verb 'piacere' you have to identify immediately the subject of your sentence (who/what is doing the action of pleasing) and conjugate the verb accordingly:

 

Pronouns Verb Piacere (Presente indicativo) To please
io piaccio I please
tu piaci you please
lui piace he pleases
lei piace she pleases
Lei piace you please (formal)
noi piacciamo (o piaciamo) we please
voi piacete you please
loro piacciono (o piaciono) they please

 

Ti piace questa spiegazione? (Do you like this explanation?)

Ti è piaciuta questa spiegazione? (Have you liked this explanation?)

 

 

VERBS COMBINED WITH PRONOUNS Lesson a_3, Lesson a_4, Lesson a_16 back button

 

Certain verbs, combined with certain pronouns, are used idiomatically. Here is a small list of commonly used 'verbs with pronouns'. Check the lessons for more details.

 

Andarsene

To go away

(E.g. Me ne vado = I'm going away)

Avercela con qualcuno

To be angry at someone

(E.g. Ce l'ho con te = I'm angry at you)

Cavarsela

To get away with something or someone, to manage

(E.g. Me la sono cavata bene = I have managed well)

Comprarsi

To buy for oneself

(E.g. Mi sono comprato la macchina = I have purchased the car)

Farcela

To succeed

(E.g. Ce l'ho fatta! = I made it! I have succeeded!)

Fregarsene

Not to give a damn

(E.g. Me ne frego = I don't give a damn

Fregatene = let go, forget it
Non me ne frega niente = I do not care at all )

Mettercela tutta

To do everything one can possibly do

(E.g. Ce la sto mettendo tutta = I'm doing all I can possibly do)

Metterci

How much time one needs to do something

(E.g. Per andare in ufficio ci metto due ore = It takes me two hours to go to the office)

Passarsela bene

To have a good period in life

(E.g. Me la passo bene = I have a good period of life)

Prendersela con qualcuno per qualcosa

To get offended with someone for something

(E.g. Te la prendi sempre con lui per tutto = you always get offended with him for everything)

Provarci

To try to do something

(E.g. Provaci! = Try!)

Riuscirci

To succeed

(E.g. Ci sono riuscito = I have made it)

Sentirsela

To feel you can do something

(E.g. Non me la sento = I don't feel I can do it)

Volerci

To need; to take; how long or how much it takes to do something

(E.g. ci vogliono tre ore per andare in città = it takes three hours to go in town.

Quanto ci vuole? = how much is it?)

Volercene

To take a lot of effort to do something

(E.g. Ce ne vuole per diventare ricchi! = it takes a lot of effort to become rich!)

 

 

ACTIVE AND PASSIVE CONSTRUCTION Lesson a_6 back button

 

In the active construction the subject of the sentence is 'active' and the verb expresses his/her/its action: "La mamma prepara la cena". "La mamma" (the mother) is the active subject, "prepara" (prepares) is the verb, "la cena" (the dinner) is the object.

 

All transitive and intransitive verbs have the active form (click transitive and intransitive verbs for more information.)

 

In the passive construction the subject is 'passive' and "undergoes" or "receives" the action performed by a doer (agent).

 

The verb changes into the passive form (using the auxiliary "essere"): "La cena è preparata dalla mamma". "La cena" (the dinner) is the subject, "è preparata" (is prepared) is the passive verb, "dalla mamma" (the mother) is the agent.

 

Only the transitive verbs with an object expressed can have the passive form (click transitive and intransitive verbs for more information.)

 

The meaning of an active sentence ("La mamma prepara la cena") and the meaning of a passive sentence ("La cena è preparata dalla mamma") are practically the same. However, as the subject changes the emphasis of the sentence changes: in the first sentence (active) "la mamma" is the focus of the action and the most important element; in the second sentence (passive) "la cena" is the focus of the action and the most important element.

 

ATTENZIONE: nella forma passiva il verbo "essere" a volte può essere sostituito dal verbo "venire":

 

Dal sito dell' Accademia della Crusca:

 

"... l’uso di venire (solo nei tempi semplici) in luogo del normale ausiliario essere conferisce alla frase il valore dinamico sottolineando un’azione: dire infatti Alle ore 20 il museo viene chiuso enuncia la programmatica azione di chiudere il museo, mentre dire Alle ore 20 il museo è chiuso costituisce una enunciazione ambigua che indica uno stato del museo alle ore 20 piuttosto che l’atto della sua chiusura. Talvolta l’uso dell’uno o dell’altro verbo può essere indifferente quanto al significato e affidato al gusto preferenziale dello scrittore, che può scrivere indifferentemente  La nave venne varata nel pomeriggio o La nave fu varata nel pomeriggio."

 

HYPOTHETICAL CONSTRUCTION (conditional clauses) Lesson a_9 back button

 

In Italian there are three forms of conditional clauses:

 

1) "Realtà" (reality) = expresses an action that will happen or it is very likely to happen. It uses the "Indicativo" or "Imperativo":

  • Se piove, prendo l'ombrello. (If it rains, I'll get the umbrella)
  • Se piove, prendi l'ombrello! (If it rains, get the umbrella!)

2) "Possibilità" (possibility) = expresses an action that might happen. It uses the "Congiuntivo imperfetto" and the "Condizionale presente" or "Imperativo":

  • Se piovesse, prenderei l'ombrello. (If it rained, I would get the umbrella)
  • Se piovesse, prendi l'ombrello! (In case it rains: get the umbrella!)

3) "Impossibilità o irrealtà" (irreality) = expresses an action that cannot happen or could have happened but did not. Depending on the time the hypothesis refers to, it uses the "Congiuntivo trapassato" and the "Condizionale presente" or "Condizionale passato":

  • Se avessi avuto l'ombrello l'avrei usato. (If I had had an umbrella, I would have used it.)
  • Se avessi usato l'ombrello ora non avrei il raffreddore! (If I had used the umbrella now I would not have a cold!)

 

DIRECT AND INDIRECT SPEECH Lesson a_10 back button

 

Here are five simple charts of the changes involved in the transformation from direct speech to indirect speech:

 

Direct speech Indirect speech

introduced by:

  • colon (:)

  • speech marks (<< >>)

  • or quotation marks (" ")

  • or a dash (-)

  • verbs as "dire, chiedere, rispondere, ordinare..."
    (to say, ask, reply, order...) +
  • "che" (that)
Tu hai detto: "voglio andare al cinema." Lui ha detto che vuole andare al cinema.

 

 

Direct speech Indirect speech

In the indirect speech the subject of the sentence usually changes to the third person (depending whom we are reporting the speech to):

  • io/tu (I/you)
  • lui/lei/egli (he/she)

  • noi/voi (we/you)
  • loro (they)

Tu hai detto: "voglio andare al cinema."

Tu hai detto: "voglio andare al cinema."

Lui ha detto che vuole andare al cinema.

Tu hai detto che vuoi andare al cinema.

 

 

Direct speech Indirect speech
The possessive adjective or pronoun changes accordingly:
  • mio/tuo
    (my/youy/mine/yours)
    nostro/vostro
    (our/your/ours/yours)
  • suo/sua/loro
    (his/her/hers/their/theirs)
Tu hai detto: "voglio andare con la mia macchina." Lui ha detto che vuole andare con la sua macchina.

 

 

Direct speech Indirect speech

Other elements usually change:

  • qui/qua (here)
  • lì/là (there)

  • questo (this)
  • quello (that)
  • ora (now)

  • allora (then)

  • oggi (today)
  • quel giorno (that day)
  • ieri (yesterday)
  • il giorno prima (the day before)
  • domani (tomorrow)
  • il giorno seguente, il giorno dopo, l'indomani (the following day)
  • venire (to come)
  • andare (to go)
Tu hai detto: "domani ci incontriamo qui." Lui ha detto che il giorno seguente si sarebbero incontrati .

 

 

Direct speech Indirect speech
The verbs in the indirect speech change accordingly:
  • presente (when the verb introducing the speech is in the present or sometimes the passato prossimo)
  • presente
  • presente (when the verb introducing the speech is in the past)
  • imperfetto
  • imperativo
  • di+infinito
  • futuro

  • condizionale passato

  • condizionale presente
  • condizionale passato
  • passato prossimo
  • trapassato prossimo
  • passato remoto
  • trapassato prossimo

Tu dici sempre: "vado al cinema" ma poi non ci vai mai.

Tu hai detto: "vado al cinema" ma poi non ci sei andato.

Tu hai detto: "domani ci incontreremo qui."

Lui dice sempre che va al cinema ma poi non ci va mai.

Lui ha detto che andava al cinema ma poi non c'è andato.

Lui ha detto che il giorno seguente si sarebbero incontrati lì.

 

 

INDIRECT QUESTIONS Lesson a_10 back button

 

The transformation from direct to indirect question is the same as that for direct/indirect speech:

 

Direct question Indirect question
La mamma domanda al bambino: "Hai fatto i compiti?" La mamma domanda al bambino se ha fatto i compiti.
La mamma domandò al bambino: "Hai fatto i compiti?" La mamma domandò al bambino se aveva fatto i compiti.

 

However, when we want to emphasize the indirect question (especially in writing) the subjunctive is required instead of the indicative:

 

Direct question Indirect question
La mamma domanda al bambino: "Hai fatto i compiti?" La mamma domanda al bambino se abbia fatto i compiti.
La mamma domandò al bambino: "Hai fatto i compiti?" La mamma domandò al bambino se avesse fatto i compiti.

 

Nowdays, there is an increasing tendency among Italians to use the indicative instead of the subjunctive. However, the subjunctive is required for a proper use of the language.

 

 

FORMA IMPLICITA Lesson a_11 back button

Spesso la forma implicita chiarisce e semplifica le frasi. Usa i modi "infinito, gerundio e participio". Questi modi verbali non sono coniugabili a seconda della persona e per questo li preferiamo quando il soggetto della frase principale corrisponde a quello della secondaria.

 

Esempio:

  1. Il dottor Gino Strada dice che è contro la guerra. (In questa frase abbiamo un dubbio: chi è contro la guerra? Gino Strada o un'altro? La persona che è contro la guerra non è specificata.)
  2. Il dottor Gino Strada dice di essere contro la guerra. (In questo caso è chiarissimo che il soggetto che parla e che è contro la guerra è Gino Strada.)
  1. Dopo che ha fondato i primi ospedali, Gino Strada è diventato famoso. (forma esplicita - frase un po' più lunga: dopo che ha fondato...)
  2. Fondati i primi ospedali, Gino Strada è diventato famoso. (forma implicita - frase più breve: fondati...)
  1. Siccome era diventato famoso, molte persone avevano supportato Gino nella costruzione di ospedali. (forma esplicita - frase un po' più complessa: siccome era diventato famoso...)
  2. Essendo diventato famoso, molte persone avevano supportato Gino nella costruzione di ospedali. (forma implicita - frase più semplice: essendo diventato famoso...)

Nota bene: se il verbo principale richiede una preposizione, è necessario inserirla davanti all'infinito. Esempio:

  • la mamma dice di fare silenzio
  • continua a studiare
  • inizio a studiare francese

Se necessario rivedi i verbi seguiti da preposizioni